Blogs

Video preview from PBS' "Autism Now" Series.

Autism Now: MacNeil, Lehrer Discuss 'National Emergency' Explored in Series

"NewsHour founder and former anchor Robert MacNeil's six-part series series on the puzzling prevalence of autism in the U.S. starts to air Monday on the PBS NewsHour. MacNeil speaks with Jim Lehrer about what's explored in the series and describes how autism has affected his family."

Link http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/health/jan-june11/autismpreview_04-15.html#

Colorado Public TV Special Focus on Autism

Katie with one of her students

SPECIAL AUTISM FOCUS

Genesis Rehab Services- hiring in CO!

Company Description Genesis Rehab Services is looking for remarkable Speech Language Pathologists. Who are we, and what do we do? Genesis Rehab Services is one of the largest adult rehab providers in the nation, employing over 7,000 therapists and assistants in over 800 facilities in 24 states & DC! We specialize in sub-acute services for adults, including long-term and transitional care, assisted and independent living, outpatient orthopedic rehab, home care, adult partial programs, specialized Alzheimer’s care, and more!

"Martha Speaks" Website a Children's PBS Favorite

The Martha Speaks Web site accompanies the television show of the same name and offers many activities kids can do on their own. Martha Speaks," produced by WGBH Boston and Studio B Productions Inc (Vancouver), has all the delight of Meddaugh's book series about Martha the talking dog, brought to life on TV and the Web at http://www.pbskids.org/martha and built upon a curriculum designed to bolster the oral vocabulary of four- to seven-year-olds. The games, videos, and activities are fun, and they help kids learn new words, too! Read about how kids can play and learn, and find out how to make the most of the site. Catherine Snow is one of the featured experts featured on the site. She writes on language and literacy development in children, focusing on how oral language skills are acquired and how they relate to literacy outcomes.

Film, The King's Speech "gets it wrong?"

According to Salon.com, the King's Speech does an excellent job of "address[ing] the complex difficulties of one man's speech, the inner silences that tortured a proud man" but may of mislead viewers as to the treatment of stuttering.

The article explains that "Despite the language of "The King's Speech" and the words of many of the film reviewers, there is no cure for stuttering. We know that the stutter is not caused by an emotional trigger, yet the cause of stuttering remains a mystery rooted in the machinery of translating our thoughts into a set of complex bodily movements. Genetic and neurological research continues and speech therapy remains a journey into the unknown, hopefully with someone you trust."

Salon does acknowledge that historical representation in fiction is not meant to instruct on current theraputic intervention and gives the movie high points stating that, "What ultimately redeems "The King's Speech," however, is the way it uses stuttering as a metaphor for human struggle. For the full article go to: http://www.salon.com/entertainment/movies/film_salon/2011/02/21/kings_sp...

Music therapy a part of Sen. Giffords rehab

Gabrielle Giffords before the shooting

According to the Houston Chronicle, e-mails sent by Gabrielle Gifford’s mother Gloria to friends tell how the Congresswoman has continued to surprise doctors and staff "due to the "amazing things that have happened. From a kind of limp noodle when you last saw her, she's alert, sits up straight with good posture ... and is working very hard," Giffords wrote last week. She later added, "As you may expect, little Miss overachiever is healing very fast."

Giffords, who lives in Tucson, Arizona, but has been in Houston for much of her daughter's rehab, wrote that it was music therapy that "really flipped the switch." She mouthed Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star and I Can't Give You Anything But Love as friends provided keyboards and chorus. She also lip-synced Happy Birthday to You in a videotape for her husband, League City astronaut Mark Kelly. Giffords wrote that they were planning to do Deep in the Heart of Texas next.

Giffords wrote most enthusiastically about the sing-alongs, comparing the scenes to a tent show revival with everyone ‘clapping and hooting’ and ‘an Andy Hardy movie, where (Mickey) Rooney declares my dad's got a barn ... let's put on a show.’ Singing is a standard technique used with brain-injury patients having trouble putting several words together, Riggs said.

Francisco said first words are a milestone for brain-injury patients but cautioned that there is no one predictor of rehab success. Rayna Boh- mann, a speech pathologist at Baylor College of Medicine and Ben Taub General Hospital, said she has seen patients who did not speak for a year but then recovered; others spoke the day after brain trauma but years later could not manage routine tasks.” For the full story see http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/7427529.html

Have or Need Therapy ideas?

Visit our Therapy Corner to read or post new therapy ideas. Have a question about therapy? Post your question on our Forum page and we'll help you get an answer! Help us build these resource for your fellow grads and colleagues!

ASHA's "Leadership in Schools" program

From ASHA's Website

Leadership in Schools is a year-long program for ASHA members with leadership potential. The program encourages you to develop your leadership skills and give back to the professions through volunteering—whether with ASHA, at your workplace, or for a related professional organization.
Components of the program include:

* Acquire leadership skills
* Build a professional network
* Give back to your profession through volunteer service
* Influence policies, programs, and services

For more information on the program go to http://www.asha.org/About/governance/Leadership-In-Schools/

"Synaptic Exuberance" Watch 9 mo. old Edward Go!

From Krulwich Wonders, an NPR science blog

"He rocks. He rolls. He sucks. He kicks. He tongues. He handles. He flips. He touches. There's not a single item in this living room that 9 month old Charles-Edward (aka Edward) doesn't exploreEdward (son of Quebec City journalist/photographer Francis Vachon) is a rolling demonstration of what the neuroscientists call "synaptic exuberance." You can't see what's happening in his brain, but he is forming ten, twenty thousand new connections every second. Watch him go." (Video below, may take time to load.)

See entire NPR article onKrulwich Wonders, an NPR Science Blog.

Looking for a special speech pathologist holiday gift?

This is not a paid advertisement! I just ran into the following page and thought you might be interested in gifts for that special SLP/colleague/friend. Visit the Cafe Press website.

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